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Do you think drawing on an iPad is considered "real art"?

Discussion in 'Art' started by mmelissaa, Jan 13, 2021.

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Do you think drawing on an iPad is considered "real art"?

  1. Yes

    4 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. No

    0 vote(s)
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  1. mmelissaa

    mmelissaa New Member

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    I've seen many videos on Instagram of artists drawing on their iPad but I've never been really impressed by their work. Compared to artists who break their back making multiple strokes to draw fur on an animal, digital artists just change their pen type and it just creates multiple strokes on its own. Having everything available to you on a device makes drawing less work, but does it count as "real art" and does it really require talent to draw on something that does the shading and straight lines for you?
     
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  2. ReiB

    ReiB New Member

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    It certainly does require talent. It may make it "easier," in the sense that you put it, but believe me; those programs still take a lot of finesse to be able to create art with. It's not as simple as point, click, hey look, I drew a photorealistic dog!
    Also, the definition of "real art" is subjective. For example, look at abstract art. One can argue that just splashing paint around haphazardly on a canvas isn't real art. But does it count more than a highly detailed digital drawing that took hours to render solely because it's done in real media?
    It's all in the eye of the beholder.
     
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  3. Lilian

    Lilian New Member

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    I think digital art should definitely be considered "real art". After all, isn't art a way for humans to express themselves, no matter the media? I agree though, making art in the digital form is very convenient, the artists have access to all the colors, pens, pencils, and brushes, and if they make a mistake they can just undo it and it won't leave any marks. At the end of the day though, you still have to know how to draw and how to use the colors, brushes, the art program, as well as the equipment you will be using. These things take a lot of skill to do, so I don't think that just because art is made in the digital form, it should no longer be considered "real art". Doing this would be really unfair to all of the artists who spent hours and hours working hard to make art in the digital form, only to be told it's not valid. I totally understand if digital art isn't your cup of tea, but that doesn't make it okay to discredit people who use that form of media to make their art. So honestly I think at the end of the day there is no "real art" because not all people have the same views on how to express themselves. As ReiB said, "It's all in the eye of the beholder.".
     
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  4. Najmah Brown

    Najmah Brown New Member

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    I know that digital Art is just that Art. Art is created out of many things scraps, trash we have seen it all. A single dot on a canvas sits in a gallery, and there is a huge bidding war. As Lilian said "it's all in the eye of the beholder", simply it is all a matter of opinion. I believe as long as we have hands drawing and painting will never leave us, and some wonderful person will always come up with new ways to use technology to make things simpler. I believe that we are just seeing the expanding of our minds to understand that everyone can truly create art in many ways. I'm sure there will always be mixed reviews on what someone wants to label as true Art. Whether digital or not someone still has to create the Art.
     
  5. itsabbygrl

    itsabbygrl New Member

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    It is digital art. People can do simple digital art that only takes them minutes, same with traditional art. People can also do exquisite digital art that takes weeks. The ability to more easily change pen color doesn't devalue the talent and skill it takes to make good digital art. This is a stretch, but applying it to the context of traditional art, just because we can go to the store and easily buy a pack of various colors of paint, rather than make each color from scratch as people have had to do it the past, doesn't mean that it's not art. It's just more a more accessible way to create art. Besides, art is simply a visual and creative expression, there's no need for back-breaking work to produce art whether digital or traditional.

    Also may I add, digital artists don't have their devices do the shading and straight lines for them, that is what they do on their own. Doing art digitally simply allows them to create art that is less costly to make and has a way larger array of colors, but the art is of their own doing.
     
  6. BestPost3

    BestPost3 New Member

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    I think that drawing on an iPad is considered real art because it still involves creativity and effort to make the drawing be more realistic. Another reason why drawing on an iPad is an art is because it can be printed on paper which makes it a tangible work of art. However, a person might think of it as not art because of the built-in features of shapes and lines that are easy to place, but that also requires creativity by adjusting it size, position, and color. At last, drawing anywhere is considered art as long as it meets the requirements of creativity, effort, and lines.
     
  7. Dimnussens

    Dimnussens New Member

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    It's the same argument as power tools versus hand tools, in my mind.

    There's a strong case that needs to be made that learning the traditional methods first is the best way to learn art. A process isn't complicated for the sake of being complicated, and traditional methods are generally the easiest possible way (either easy in terms of teaching, or execution) to get the desired results. Watch a Bob Ross video and he tends to start with a large, light colored painting that covers most of the canvas, because in his style of painting you need to put dark colors down over light colors for better results. It's procedural. A painting of a wooded mountain starts out as a picture of a sky, because the mountains need to obscure the view of the sky. Students might get irritated at the 'waste' of effort painting sky that doesn't need seen, and once they're skilled, they might even get away with cutting corners. Ultimately, that's what learning a particular style is; you follow the procedure until you innately understand where you are allowed to cut corners.

    So, to come back to Ipads or drawing tablets in general; a digital tool gives you the ability to edit things in real time, using layers and effects, that would take hours upon hours to do traditionally. Except, all of that is worth nothing if you're not trying to make art with it. Might as well start with the basics and then transition to digital. Then again, if someone learns on digital and that's all they've ever done, if their results are good then that's all that matters. Everyone starts somewhere and needs to be bad at something for a while before they can get good at it.

    And if nothing else, Bob Ross' videos seem to translate well if you do them digitally. Learning to translate techniques across mediums is a skill unto itself.

    As for whether it's real art, it's like asking if soda can be wet. It's not water, but is it wet? All art is art. Shoot glitter out of a straw onto some Elmer's glue sticks and you're making art. Digital art is the fastest growing medium out there with a much lower barrier to entry for the average person. Why gatekeep the creativity?
     

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